Saturday, June 2, 2012

WHERE HAVE ALL THE HOLLY GOLIGHTLYS GONE?

In the words of Breakfast at Tiffany's Holly Golightly "Oh golly gee damn!".

We're sure that crossed a few people's minds when they saw the Chistmas and pre Christmas sales figures for Tiffany'sAudrey Hepburn's character's favorite place in New York, the place that made her and any Audrey Hepburn fans and wannabes:

 "calm(..) down right away, the quietness and the proud look of it; nothing very bad could happen to you there, not with those kind men in their nice suits...," .

(Image via Wispiration)


Well it looks like it has been far too quiet for Tiffany's over the Christmas season, with figures in in US showing significantly lower sales growth than expected - with only Asian markets doing reasonably well. Michael J. Kowalski, Tiffany & Co. chairman and CEO, said,

"After achieving very strong and better-than-expected sales and earnings growth in the first three quarters of 2011, sales weakened markedly in the United States and Europe during the holiday season, reflecting restrained spending by consumers for fine jewellery." 

It must be said that many luxury goods analysts and observers were rather surprised,  since it goes completely against the trend in the US where they are finally starting to see improved prospects for the economy and shareholders saw their shares drop 10% yesterday.

Founded in 1837 as a 'stationary and fancy goods emporium', Tiffany & Co., or Tiffany's as it is affectionately known worldwide, has come to symbolize luxury and elegance.  In the 19th century the combined strengths of artistic quality and fine craftmanship ensured Tiffany's was celebrated amongst its clients both at home and abroad.  This was then followed by a period where Tiffany introduced art nouveau to the US under the guidance of Louis Tiffany.

In the 50's  Tiffany's initiated a policy of hiring design luminaries under the guidance of Hoving which continued until the 80s such as : Jean Schlumberger, Van Day Truex, Donald Clafin, Elsa Peretti and Angela Cummings to name a few,  and additionally collaborated with well known designers.

Despite what some have described as a 'lowering of standards' after Tiffany was bought by Avon in the '80s and introduced lower quality and inexpensive items to the collections, in the 1990s Tiffany's management embarked on a major marketing campaign and company structuring to impose Tiffany's upper class patina whilst opening to younger clientele and middle class market with 'affordable' quality products.  Over the years Tiffany's has weathered recession, change in management and designers and managed to maintain its status symbol of exclusivity because as  writer Megan Stacey states:

Tiffany & Co. endures, in part, because it products promise far more than quality craftmanship, they promise to lift the possessor up into an exclusive circle of social privilege and to identify a Tiffany client as having that most elusive quality of all, good taste.'



For whatever the reason this year's Christmas has proven more modest for Tiffany's, we hope that those "kind men in their nice suits" do whatever needs to be done to ensure Tiffany's shines again in time for St. Valentine's, because there's a Holly Golightly in each and every one of us just hoping to receive that exquisite "Tiffany Blue" box on St. Valentine's Day!


(Antique Jewelry University)
http://www.fashionencyclopedia.com/
http://investor.tiffany.com/

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Green Pebbles A Passion for Luxury Fashion and Watches: WHERE HAVE ALL THE HOLLY GOLIGHTLYS GONE?

WHERE HAVE ALL THE HOLLY GOLIGHTLYS GONE?

In the words of Breakfast at Tiffany's Holly Golightly "Oh golly gee damn!".

We're sure that crossed a few people's minds when they saw the Chistmas and pre Christmas sales figures for Tiffany'sAudrey Hepburn's character's favorite place in New York, the place that made her and any Audrey Hepburn fans and wannabes:

 "calm(..) down right away, the quietness and the proud look of it; nothing very bad could happen to you there, not with those kind men in their nice suits...," .

(Image via Wispiration)


Well it looks like it has been far too quiet for Tiffany's over the Christmas season, with figures in in US showing significantly lower sales growth than expected - with only Asian markets doing reasonably well. Michael J. Kowalski, Tiffany & Co. chairman and CEO, said,

"After achieving very strong and better-than-expected sales and earnings growth in the first three quarters of 2011, sales weakened markedly in the United States and Europe during the holiday season, reflecting restrained spending by consumers for fine jewellery." 

It must be said that many luxury goods analysts and observers were rather surprised,  since it goes completely against the trend in the US where they are finally starting to see improved prospects for the economy and shareholders saw their shares drop 10% yesterday.

Founded in 1837 as a 'stationary and fancy goods emporium', Tiffany & Co., or Tiffany's as it is affectionately known worldwide, has come to symbolize luxury and elegance.  In the 19th century the combined strengths of artistic quality and fine craftmanship ensured Tiffany's was celebrated amongst its clients both at home and abroad.  This was then followed by a period where Tiffany introduced art nouveau to the US under the guidance of Louis Tiffany.

In the 50's  Tiffany's initiated a policy of hiring design luminaries under the guidance of Hoving which continued until the 80s such as : Jean Schlumberger, Van Day Truex, Donald Clafin, Elsa Peretti and Angela Cummings to name a few,  and additionally collaborated with well known designers.

Despite what some have described as a 'lowering of standards' after Tiffany was bought by Avon in the '80s and introduced lower quality and inexpensive items to the collections, in the 1990s Tiffany's management embarked on a major marketing campaign and company structuring to impose Tiffany's upper class patina whilst opening to younger clientele and middle class market with 'affordable' quality products.  Over the years Tiffany's has weathered recession, change in management and designers and managed to maintain its status symbol of exclusivity because as  writer Megan Stacey states:

Tiffany & Co. endures, in part, because it products promise far more than quality craftmanship, they promise to lift the possessor up into an exclusive circle of social privilege and to identify a Tiffany client as having that most elusive quality of all, good taste.'



For whatever the reason this year's Christmas has proven more modest for Tiffany's, we hope that those "kind men in their nice suits" do whatever needs to be done to ensure Tiffany's shines again in time for St. Valentine's, because there's a Holly Golightly in each and every one of us just hoping to receive that exquisite "Tiffany Blue" box on St. Valentine's Day!


(Antique Jewelry University)
http://www.fashionencyclopedia.com/
http://investor.tiffany.com/

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,